Gallery Artists > Richard Goetz Biography :

Richard Goetz (1915 - 1991)  Artworks >>

Born in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, Richard Vernon Goetz grew up in Pryor Creek, Oklahoma; after attending Oklahoma City University and the University of Oklahoma at Norman. He came to New York to study at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League. Among his teachers were George A. Bridgman and Jonas Lie. He also studied with Henry Hensche at the Cape School of Art in Provincetown, Massachusetts. He further broadened his training by extensive travel in Europe, where he studied the Dutch Masters and the French Impressionists. Acknowledging art as one of the highest forms of self-expression, Goetz continued to paint in a classic mode. His carefully composed still lives of American Kachina Dolls and a variety of rare Western, Indian and Oriental artifacts, suffused with a scintillating light, are balanced with contrasting hues. For many years after his marriage to Edith Goetz, also an artist, Goetz lived and worked in Oklahoma City where he conducted his own art school. The Oklahoma City Art Center has an important collection of his paintings and drawings. A Grand Central artist member for over 25 years, Goetz exhibited with galleries in New York and Santa Fe. He has also exhibited with the National Academy of Western Art at the Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City, and in the Western Heritage Sale in Texas. Goetz's many awards include the McDonough and Purchase Awards at the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio; and the President's Award, American Artists Professional League. Before moving to upper Westchester County, New York, where he maintained his studio, Richard Goetz painted numerous portraits including those of the late President John F. Kennedy and the legendary Washington party-giver Perle Mesta. Goetz also taught at the Art Students League in Manhattan. He passed on in 1991. Source askart.com

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